Thursday, July 12, 2012

Which Books Should You Read This Summer?

So, this is a really great graphic from Teach.com and I thought I'd share it. Not all of the choices are what I think of as the best example in a category, but there are still a heck of a lot of good ones here, including genre stuff, some of which I've reviewed here. After taking a gander, feel free to share whether you have any good alternative choices for some of these categories:

Summer Reading Flowchart

16 comments:

  1. From a reader's pov, I'd choose Mark Twain than Edgar Allen Poe. Harry Harrison's "Stainless Steel Rat" over Adams' THGTTG.

    Dawkins' "The Magic of Reality" than "Naked Ape".

    Agree with "The Mount of Monte Cristo".

    In the Aliens category, Eric Flint's "Mother of Demons" in the xenobiology aspect.

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    1. Oh, but I do love THGTTG. I'll have to re-read it sometime soon to get a more adult critical perspective on it...but I doubt there is a funnier science fiction novel out there.

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  2. This actually represents my summer reading list pretty well -- Never Let Me Go, check. 1984, coming up next if I can ever find my copy. And there's even some nonfiction represented!

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    1. I think we should read some Marquez or Wilde together.

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    2. You think we need more Magical Realism in our lives? I've actually read "Dorian Gray" before, but maybe some Marquez...in all my free time, of course.

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  3. Hmmmmm... my Summer Reading List usually would have a Stephen King novel in it somewhere. Here there isn't a single one; even 'The Stand' would have been a good classic for me to get into over a Summer - seeing it happened over a Summer in the book. :D

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    1. I've not read Stephen King, so I don't know how "critically acclaimed" his works have been, but as far as I can tell, the novels listed here, including the genre ones, are either recognized classics or critically acclaimed/award winners (like Ishiguro's Never Let Me Go). It seems that Teach.com is trying to make a point about critical darlings vs. plain old entertainment.

      Having said that, I've been hearing a lot of good things about The Stand lately.

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    2. Stephen King's stories are quite good, especially the ones made into non-horror movies. I'm not good with with horror movies.

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    3. Book Riot has a piece about whether a person should feel bad for reading/liking Stephen King here:

      http://bookriot.com/2012/07/13/should-you-feel-bad-about-reading-stephen-king/

      The Shawshank Redemption is a GREAT movie, and I can tell that no matter how good his prose ability is, he has an ability to inspire art and creativity in film-makers. I've had him on my list to test out for a long time.

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    4. I have long wanted to read King's book on writing -- it is supposed to be excellent. "Shawshank Redemption" is the only thing of his I've read all the way through (wait, maybe I read "The Body"?); although it is good, the movie is even better, in my opinion.

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    5. Oh, Neal, you gotta get your nose into some SK, he's a great storyteller and - please, oh please - get into his older stuff before you read his recent works. My first book that I read of his was 'Christine'... then I read 'The Stand' and 'The Dead Zone' and 'Salem's Lot'... now all of those made lousy movies, but 'The Dead Zone' made a brilliant tv series. :D

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    6. Can't go wrong with a little Anthony Michael Hall.

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  4. Holy crap that was a fun post. I've read a bunch of these but I got a few ideas as well. Thanks for this!

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    1. Thanks for taking a look! It was nice to see just how extensive it was...you start scrolling...and keep scrolling, and scrolling...

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  5. I don't remember where I first saw this, but I don't recall it bugging me as much. Not that anything is really bad about this list, but it's very standard and familiar. I'm really happy to see some of my favorite books up there (The Count of Monte Cristo - Spot. On.), but it feels like a very safe list. Yes, it's great to see books like Feed and The House of the Scorpion appear and I technically can't think of any "better" titles to propose, leading me to assume my annoyance is probably just tired crankiness, but still...

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    1. Very well-read people (I'm not including myself, since I still haven't read A LOT of these) may not find a lot that is new or surprising here. And though I haven't read all of them, I'm pretty familiar with 80 or 90% of the titles. The list, I think isn't so much about hidden gems or surprising choices as it is about reminding us about the books that have been on our list that we just haven't gotten to yet. It's not a perfect chart, but I do think that it's clever, and if nothing else, gets me thinking about what to read.

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